Heritage Honor Roll

Every individual, group and business has a story worth telling. A legacy story can be presented in text and through photographs, home movies and other video and audio mediums. It can also be published in multiple languages and include hyperlinks to other Web sites important to the honoree. The Heritage Honor Roll may contain more than one legacy story for an individual or a group—or the legacy story may appear in more than one language—because members have opted to recognize different contributions of the same individual or group or wanted to share the story in their native language.

Leveraging the public’s interest in legacy preservation enables Americans All to continue to pursue our education mission. We invest more than half of fees collected to strengthen social studies instruction and promote civic engagement, so K–12 students are better prepared to participate in our nation’s democracy, economy and workforce.

See our Sponsor Directory for a listing of members and their honoree’s legacy stories.

Click here to view the benefits of using an Americans All Heritage Honor Roll legacy story to best keep your loved one's memory alive, forever.

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About the Heritage Honor Roll

Within the Heritage Honor Roll, individual honorees are listed alphabetically by last name. If included, maiden names appear between parentheses and nicknames appear between quotation marks. Group honorees are listed by the first letter of the group’s name. If the name starts with the word “The,” such as “The Anderson Trio,” it is alphabetized under the letter “T.” If the group is commonly called “Anderson Trio,” it is alphabetized under the letter “A.” The name of the sponsor appears in square brackets following the honoree’s name.

If an exact date of birth or death—or formation or disbandment—is not known, we add “c.” to indicate it is an approximation. If the individual is still alive or the group is still active, we leave the field blank. The honoree’s occupation, field, industry or profession is listed last.

Legacy stories reflect members’ views. Americans All does not vet these stories for accuracy. If you find content or language you deem offensive, please contact us.

To enable users to view all legacy stories, we preset the “Language” field to “-Any-.” To view all legacy stories on a specific honoree, add the honoree’s name in the appropriate field—individual or group– and click “Apply.” All legacy stories on that honoree will appear.

To find an individual or a group legacy on our Web site, type /node/ followed by its six-digit identification number as shown here: www.americansall.org/node/553031. The /node/number appears after the honoree’s information.

Last Name of Individual
First Name of Individual
Group Name
Language
State

Constantine "Connie" Foltis [Constantine Foltis Memorial Foundation] (December 1, 1929 - June 16, 2011) Naval Architect /node/434039

Constantine "Connie" Foltis was born in New York City on December 1, 1929, and died at Bailey Family Center for Caring of Community Hospice in St. Augustine, Florida, on June 16, 2011. Those who knew him at the center would never forget his generosity, talent, laughter, friendship, love, and compassion.

Henry Ford [Ancient Order of Hiberinans] (July 30, 1863 - April 7, 1947) Founder of Ford Motor Company /node/564868

In 1846, a carpenter named William Ford fled his home in Co. Cork, Ireland with scarcely two Pounds in his pocket to escape the poverty of the Great Hunger. He sailed on a coffin ship to Canada with his eyes set on America. He stole across the border and settled in Michigan where he began farming. He married and, in 1863, his wife presented him with a son whom he named Henry.

Stephen Foster [Ancient Order of Hibernians] (July 4, 1826 - January 13, 1864) American Songwriter /node/564866

America's Troubadour of Song was an Irish American born on the fourth of July! If you said George M. Cohan, you'd be mistaken, for the title America's Troubadour of Song is reserved for another Irish American born on July 4. He was the Great Grandson of a Co. Derry emigrant who settled in New Jersey in 1725 and later moved to Pennsylvania. We’re referring to Stephen Foster.

Patrick Sarsfield Gilmore [Ancient Order of Hibernians] (December 25, 1829 - September 24, 1892) Composer and Band Leader /node/564827

America’s first superstars were the leaders of America’s first bands—her marching Brass Bands—and though John Philip Sousa was certainly one of them, he was not the first. That honor goes to a man whom Sousa himself admired and whom he called matchless. He was a man who, in his day, was called America’s Greatest Bandleader, and The Musician of the People—Patrick Sarsfield Gilmore. 

George Alfred Harrison [Tay Hahn] (September 14, 1918 - October 20, 1987) Military Officer /node/433992

September 3, 1939—“It was the best of times. It was the worst of times." My father had just been admitted to law school, and Great Britain had just declared war on Germany. September 4, 1939, was his 21st birthday. Overwhelmed by patriotic fever, he declined law school and joined the Royal Air Force (RAF).

Kenneth M. Hedrick [Hedrick Family] (March 15, 1983 - January 12, 1992) Firefighter /node/433993

On January 12, 1992 Kenny was killed in the Line of Duty. He was a volunteer firefighter with Morningside Volunteer Fire Department in Maryland and had responded with his co-workers to a call for help from a family who lived nearby the fire station.

Matthew Alexander Henson [Robert Abramson] (August 8, 1866 - March 9, 1955) Explorer /node/433994

Matthew Alexander Henson was born August 8, 1866, to free African American parents on an impoverished tenant farm in Charles County, Maryland. By the time he was 11 years old, both of his parents had died and he lived with relatives. At age 13 he went to sea as a cabin boy.

John Holland [Ancient Order of Hibernians] (February 29, 1840 - August 12, 1914) Inventor and Engineer /node/564838

His name was John Philip Holland and he was born in Liscannor, Co. Clare, Ireland, on February 24, 1841. He was only three when the potato failure devastated his country. He survived but suffered poor eyesight for the rest of his life. His father was a member of the Coast Guards and young John inherited a love of the sea. 

Sam Houston [Texas State Historical Association] (March 2, 1793 - July 26, 1863) American Soldier and Politician /node/565022

Sam Houston was born on March 2, 1793, the fifth child of Samuel and Elizabeth (Paxton) Houston, Rockbridge County, Virginia. He was of Scots-Irish ancestry and reared Presbyterian. His father died when he was thirteen, and in the spring of 1807, he emigrated with his mother, five brothers, and three sisters to Blount County in Eastern Tennessee, establishing a farm near Maryville.

Jovita Idár [Mariana Aguilar] (September 7, 1885 - June 15, 1946) Teacher, Journalist and Political Activist /node/433995

Jovita Idár, teacher, journalist, and political activist was born in Laredo in 1885, one of eight children of Jovita and Nicasio Idár. She attended the Holding Institute (a Methodist school) in Laredo, from which she earned a teaching certificate in 1903. She then taught at a small school in Ojuelos. Inadequate equipment and poor conditions, as well as her inability to improve them, frustrated her, so she resigned and joined . . .

Fay Rubenstein Jacobs [Fay Jacobs] (June 29, 1948 - ?) Writer & Humorist /node/553012

Fay Jacobs is a writer and humorist from NYC transplanted to Washington, DC, then Rehoboth Beach, DE. She has four published books, is a GLBT activist and is married to Bonnie Quesenberry. She has kept company with a long line of Schnauzers and lives by the motto "nothing is ever so bad if it's worth the story you can tell."

Mary Harris "Mother" Jones [Ancient Order of Hibernians] (c.1837 - November 30, 1930) Labor Organizer and Orator /node/564833

Few would argue with this feisty little Irish lady for, although she was known as the Miner’s Angel, she was also known as the Mother of All Agitators. Born in Cork City, Ireland, her family fled the Great Hunger to Toronto, Canada, when she was a child. She trained as a teacher and worked briefly as a teacher and as a dressmaker. In 1861, Mary married George Jones, an iron molder and union organizer in Memphis, Tennessee.